Posts Tagged art

David Hodges – Collective Insites Project Adds a New Dimesnion to Interpretation of Historic Store

New media artist David Hodges has used the Collective Insites  project to develop a new interpretive resource for the National Trust property, Brennan and Geraghty’s Store, donating many hours, his artistic talents and his technical expertise at a minute fraction of the real cost. The final result, an interactive DVD of short video clips telling the story of significant items from the collection will be unveiled at the opening of the exhibition and donated by David to the National Trust.

David talks about his work with Brennan and Geraghty’s Store below.

“The project has been a collaborative process between Ken Brooks and myself. Ken’s involvement has been providing input into every stage of the project, passing ideas on the items being displayed, the interface design, acting in the production video and providing feedback at the stage meetings.

My involvement has been vast across a number of areas in the screen and media field. The interface concepts were drawn before the digital version was created to save time. A test video was shot and modified for proof of concept. These processes allow you to get a feel for the production inspiring ideas, identifying pitfalls and highlighting areas of improvement.

Working with digital media has it draw backs as well as its benefits. Systems are software driven and to complete this project, improvements had to be made to the workstation I currently use. Software crashes and files can become corrupt; this is a standard in the digital media field so professionals save versions of work over and over along with automated system backups on a daily and weekly basis. All of these processes add to the space taken on the hard drives in the system.

The work represents around 300 hours of work that has been completed over two and a half months. That, combined with my main job meant a seven day week for the entirety of the project (I am looking forward to a day off). The process mentioned has created over 200 gigabytes of information contained in 19,282 files.

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Bringing Maryborough’s Industrial Past to Life

Visitors to Gatakers Artspace in Maryborough have been surprised and delighted to find the upstairs space in the gallery converted to an artist’s workplace. Amongst the current exhibition of industrial moulds and images from Maryborough’s past, artist Niels Ellmoos is working on his contribution to ‘Collective Insites’, a project that brings together local artists and historical collections.

‘Industrial archeology’ is the central theme of Niel’s art practice. He describes his contemporary artworks as a sort of ‘reimagining’ of history through objects.

On the West Coast of Tasmania he  interviewed  some of the old miners, and made video tapes, drawings  and sculptures that were inspired by Tasmania’s strong mining history

Niels current focus is on the industrial history of  Maryborough. It’s a rich and very interesting  part of the town’s past that has given him a lot of  material to work with, including the city’s large collection of industrial moulds and other industrial objects that are rarely on show to the public. Although they may originally have had mundane uses, some of these objects are beautiful sculptural pieces themselves.

Niels will be working as artist in residence  in the Gatakers Artspace. He’s happy to have visitors drop in and talk with him about what he’s doing and how his work is progressing. He’s already made contact with some of the colourful characters from Maryborough’s industrial past.

Moving the moulds from storage to the gallery

 

 

There are five local artists working on the Collective Insites project, which will open at Gatakers Artspace in Maryborough  in May.

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MAVIS BANK – Christine Turner gets inspired by the collection

Sometimes one comes across a collection that sits outside the norm. Mavis Bank in Maryborough is one of those.

It is an eclectic and personal,  private collection of bric-a-brac, furniture, vehicles, household appliances, toys and much more from no particular era (except it’s mostly late 19th early 20th Century), housed in a generic, not overly interesting Queenslander style house hidden behind a magnificent overgrown garden. There are no labels and no particular arrangement of the objects other than what suits the fancy and the needs of the owners. Everywhere you turn you see something new and interesting and perhaps disconnected from the last thing you just saw. The house is filled to overflowing with collected ‘stuff’, treasured and displayed in a domestic, ‘cottage’ setting.

Owners Elizabeth McKenzie and partner Patrick  live in the building, in the collection amongst the objects which they sit on, play with, tinker with, listen to and use.  So for them it is not a museum, it is their home, and a very personal space. Many of the objects have a story directly related to their own personal histories. Elizabeth and Patrick kindly open their home for the public to visit, and once through the doors it’s a journey into domestic nostalgia.

As part of the Collective Insites project artist Christine Turner will be working with the  Mavis Bank collection, letting it speak to her, and making her own particular interpretations of the objects and the collection as a whole.

Christine’s practice encompasses assemblage, installation, digital imaging, collage and photography. Her works relate to identity, memory, the body, power and the sacred. An avid collector herself, she uses her own collections in her works, and understands the urge that drives those who fall in love with objects from the past. At Mavis Bank she has found an instant rapport with Elizabeth McKenzie in a shared love of domestic memorabilia and is working to incorporate items from the Mavis Bank collection into her artwork that will form part of the Collective Insites exhibitions at GatakersArtspace later in the year.


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Welcome to Creative Histories

Creative Histories is a project of Queensland artist Judy Barrass. It seeks to connect artists with  museums and collections in a partnership that creates fresh ways of interpreting, commenting on or presenting history.

This blog will be used as a resource base to document various projects and investigate what happens when artists focus their attention on collections, museums and historical places. It is also intended as a resource for museums who may be interested in the processes, who seek information or advice on working with artists to renew or invigorate the interface between history and the general community.

The project has grown out of a long term interest in and connection with historical places and collections and several projects on the Sunshine Coast in Queensland. Judy is currently working on a major project ‘Collective Insites’ which brings together five artists  to work with five collections in the historic town of Maryborough. As curator of this project she is keen to develop a long term working partnership between the artists, the historical collections and the local art gallery, Gatakers Artspace.

Judy’s work is informed by her history as an artist whose major focus has been on place. In this Creative Histories project she is also working closely with Fiona Mohr, who is Regional Museum Development Officer with the Queensland Museum. Fiona brings her knowledge and expertise in museums and collections to the project. Her creative background and an interest in fresh approaches to collections fuels her interest and adds to the project.

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