Posts Tagged Peta Duggan

Peta Duggan – Maryborough Military Museum, Collective Insites, Gatakers Artspace Mackay

Peta Duggan is a young woman who thinks things through, who asks the difficult questions and worries about the answers. Her interaction with the Maryborough Military Museum led to hours of thought and internal discussions that were documented in diary format.

Working with the Military Museum presented her with a personal dilemma. She was acutely aware of the honour and pride that the museum and its collection engendered in its custodians and in the community, and of the need to give due deference to the museum’s stories and heroes; and yet she was also not prepared to ignore her own distaste for war and aggression. Peta’s diaries tell of an internal conversation and questioning that went far deeper than interaction with mere objects.

The curator and the selection committee had deliberately chosen this vibrant young digital artist to interact with the conservative militarymuseum, and were sure the owners and staff had the goodwill and maturity to cope with what might come of it. The outcome has been exciting and rewarding.

The museum gave Peta full access to the collection and to a bank of many images of objects. She used many of these images in her work, combining  them with her own imagery  into a richly layered digital tapestry of story upon story.

To overcome some of the conflicts Peta found in dealing with her subject she positioned her work well into the future.

A time capsule (a large sculptural object created from found objects and digital imagery, created 100 years earlier has recently landed in the year 4200AZ  into a world where humans are no longer like us, but wars and conflicts are still occurring. The contents are now opened and revealed to the earth’s inhabitants.

 

 

 

 

 

Peta’s collection of 18 digital images  shown in the exhibition documents the contents of the capsule. They represent both an aftermath and our own future. Many fantastic and unimagined things have happened, and many wars have taken place, but ethical questions remain unanswered, which leads us to wonder about the nature of conflict and war. Will we continue to repeat history?

Her work recontextualises the message of the museum, placing it in a far less certain environment where truths are contested, assumptions are laid bare, and alternative points of view are allowed.  In doing so she allows her audience to consider the message of the museum outside the emotive context of its sacred objects and stories.

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Collective Insites Opening

A large crowd gathered at Gatakers Artspace to celebrate the opening of the Collective Insites  exhibition on May 6th 2011. Jenny Galligan,Executive Director (Arts Development), Arts Queensland opened the exhibition.


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Hanging ‘Collective Insites’ exhibition, Gatakers Artspace, Maryborough

It seemed like it was never going to happen. The gallery looked like a construction site. It’s hard to image what comes before a beautifully  presented exhibition in a white cube gallery space. Chaos and stress.

Niels Ellmoos was hard at work putting together the frame-work for his massive charcoal drawing. His portable museums were a mass of bits and pieces, tools, glues, and unkowns.

Susan Hutton seemed like she was on a dream run, putting together four of her five pieces in record time. But it seemed like a cat was going to be her undoing. Many tries later the cat finally conformed to Susan’s idea of where and how it should sit on its pedestal.

It was then up to Christine Turner to create havoc and challenge everyone to remember how the mangle went back together. Trevor Spohr from Gatakers was his usual unflappable self coming up with solutions to every  problem, and finding a way to get everything done.

Of course Fiona Mohr also had a hand in trying to put that mangle back together.  In the end we had to call in the experts in the guise of Patrick from Mavis Bank.  Fiona  was heard emitting huge sigh of relief that her expertise would no longer be called into question.

Over in a corner was what we  affectionately called ‘the Tardis’, but which was, in reality David Hodges’ installation. Sometime after lunch  workmen in flurescent vests arrived and started doing all sorts of things to it. We don’t know what. Perhaps they were attempting time travel. We’re looking forward to how this thing is going to operate, if it does. Peta Duggan was nowhere to be found. We think she was at home putting the finishing touches to a fantastic and amazing sculpture that will definitely not be able to be transported and will never fit into the lift to the first floor. But we hope she’s having fun. John Meyers from the military Museum came in to  go over her work with a fine tooth comb and we are pleased to say he actually liked some pieces. Thanks John!

Make sure you’re there for the opening of this amazing exhibition. Gatakers Gallery, Maryborough, Friday May 6th, 6 pm. The catering  is going to be great! All are welcome to attend.

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Collective Insites Exhibition Opens May 6th

The opening of
of two new exhibitions at Gatakers Artspace: Collective Insites curated by Judy Barrass and
featuring works by five artists and In the Half Light by Noel Brown.
DATE 6 May 2011
LOCATION Gatakers Artspace, 311 Kent Street, Maryborough
TIME 6.00pm for 6.30pm
Collective Insites to be opened by Jenny Galligan,
Executive Director (Arts Development), Arts Queensland
In the Half Light to be opened by Trevor Spohr
TELEPHONE Trevor Spohr (07) 4190 5723
RSVP 2 May 2011
gatakersartspace@frasercoast.qld.gov.au

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Maryborough Military Museum and digital artist Peta Duggan

The Maryborough Military and Colonial Museum is a surprising gem to find in a regional centre. It was established as a private museum by John and Else Meyers using  much of John’s own extensive collection. The museum is now a public trust, and the collection has been added to by generous donation and further collecting.This important collection interprets military campaigns and aspects of Australia’s colonial history. It is housed in a magnificent old warehouse style building near the wharf area in Maryborough, and contains many significant objects.

The museum is staffed by volunteers and is very much a part of the local community.

As part of the Collective Insites project digital artist Peta Duggan will be interpreting the collection in her own inimitable style.

Peta  is a local resident of Maryborough who likes to manipulate images of  everyday objects and shapes in her work.   Her imagination leads her to find hidden meanings and satire of a dark nature reflected in many of her images.  She says ” humans can be seen as  concepts and intrigue of the imagination, where space, time and thought are one ”

It will be interesting to see what Peta makes of the museum and what the museum makes of her. It is certainly not a conventional mix, and John Meyers from the museum is to be congratulated in his willingness to participate in the project, and to allow an emerging artist working in new technologies full reign in his museum. Peta’s mind is already racing ahead with the possibilities. She says, after her first visit:

As I walked into the old historical building in Wharf Street Maryborough, in Queensland, my senses were filled with awe…Not only is this building, built in the 1800’s, the military collection is the most highly prized museum in –as to be so bold!  in Queensland, and even bolder! Possibly more impressive than the National war museum located in Canberra (1991 visit).”

Peta’s work will be part of the Collective Insites exhibition at Gatakers Artspace in May, and she will be having a solo exhibition at the gallery later in the year.


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